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April 2021

Wednesday, 28 April 2021 00:00

Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Monday, 26 April 2021 00:00

What is Diabetic Limb Salvage?

Diabetes can create a perfect storm of complications which sometimes leads to ulcers on the feet that go undetected and don’t heal. While the overwhelming majority of foot ulcers heal with proper foot care and treatment, a foot ulcer that does not heal may lead to infection, tissue necrosis (dead tissue), and—in severe cases—amputation. Diabetic limb salvage is a complex process involving a variety of procedures and techniques with the goal of preserving the limb as much as possible, and reducing the risks of future infections and ulcerations. If you have questions about diabetic foot conditions or would like to know more regarding limb salvage, it is highly suggested that you seek the counsel of a podiatrist. 

Limb salvage can be an effective way in preventing the need for limb amputation. If you have diabetes, cancer, or any other condition that could lead to foot amputation if left unchecked, consult with The podiatrists from Grand Haven Foot & Ankle. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Limb Salvage?

Limb salvage is the attempt of saving a limb, such as the foot from amputation. Podiatrists also try to make sure that there is enough function in the foot after the salvage that it is still usable. Diabetes is the number one cause of non-traumatic amputations in the United States. Those with diabetes experience poor blood circulation, which prevents proper healing of an ulcer. If the ulcer is left uncheck, it could become infected, which could result in the need for amputation.

However, there are other causes as well, such as cancer and traumatic injury. Links between higher mortality rates and amputation have been found. This translates into higher healthcare costs, and a reduced quality of life and mobility for amputees. Podiatrists have attempted to increase the prevalence of limb salvage in an attempt to solve these issues.

Diagnosis and Treatment

Limb salvage teams have grown in recent years that utilize a number of different treatments to save the infected limb. This includes podiatrists that specialize in wound care, rehabilitation, orthotics, and surgery. Through a combination of these methods, limb salvage has been found to be an effective treatment for infected limbs, and as an alternative to amputation. Podiatrists will first evaluate the potential for limb salvage and determine if the limb can be saved or must be amputated. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Grand Haven, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Monday, 19 April 2021 00:00

Two Types of Achilles Tendonitis

The Achilles tendon plays a significant role in proper foot function. It is located in the back of the leg, and connects the heel to the calf muscles. It is responsible for pointing and flexing the foot, in addition to participating in running and jumping activities. Damage or overuse of this tendon can cause severe pain and discomfort in the calf area, and daily movements may be difficult to complete. There are two types of tendonitis that can happen from an Achilles tendon injury. Insertional Achilles tendonitis happens in the area where the heel joins with the tendon. Small tears in the middle of the tendon can be classified as non-insertional Achilles tendonitis. If you have endured an injury, and feel you may have Achilles tendonitis, please confer with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can offer you correct treatment techniques.

Achilles tendon injuries need immediate attention to avoid future complications. If you have any concerns, contact The podiatrists of Grand Haven Foot & Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is the Achilles Tendon?

The Achilles tendon is a tendon that connects the lower leg muscles and calf to the heel of the foot. It is the strongest tendon in the human body and is essential for making movement possible. Because this tendon is such an integral part of the body, any injuries to it can create immense difficulties and should immediately be presented to a doctor.

What Are the Symptoms of an Achilles Tendon Injury?

There are various types of injuries that can affect the Achilles tendon. The two most common injuries are Achilles tendinitis and ruptures of the tendon.

Achilles Tendinitis Symptoms

  • Inflammation
  • Dull to severe pain
  • Increased blood flow to the tendon
  • Thickening of the tendon

Rupture Symptoms

  • Extreme pain and swelling in the foot
  • Total immobility

Treatment and Prevention

Achilles tendon injuries are diagnosed by a thorough physical evaluation, which can include an MRI. Treatment involves rest, physical therapy, and in some cases, surgery. However, various preventative measures can be taken to avoid these injuries, such as:

  • Thorough stretching of the tendon before and after exercise
  • Strengthening exercises like calf raises, squats, leg curls, leg extensions, leg raises, lunges, and leg presses

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Grand Haven, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Achilles Tendon Injuries
Monday, 12 April 2021 00:00

Are Bunions and Bunionettes the Same?

Bunions—a very common foot disorder—are bony protrusions on the joint of the big toe, which cause it to point towards the second toe. Bunions can be very painful and are often genetic, or caused by wearing shoes that are too tight. Bunionettes, or tailor’s bunions, are a form of bunion that appears on the outside of the pinky toe. Bunions and bunionettes are painful, and can cause swelling, redness, and soreness around the joint, along with limited range of movement. Bunions that are left untreated can cause deformities or misalignments in the foot and may require surgery to correct. One of the best ways to prevent bunions and bunionettes from forming is to wear comfortable, low-heeled shoes with a rounded toe-box, which will allow plenty of room for your toes to spread out and move freely. Contact a podiatrist who can offer preventative measures against bunions, or treat them successfully if they do form.

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact The podiatrists of Grand Haven Foot & Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Grand Haven, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions

The thick and fibrous band of tissue that runs along the bottom of the foot connecting the heel bone to the front of your foot is known as the plantar fascia. Inflammation of the plantar fascia, usually as a result of overuse, is known as plantar fasciitis. Plantar fasciitis usually leads to heel pain, heel spurs, or arch pain. Athletes who participate in sports that require a lot of running and jumping are said to be at a higher risk for developing this condition. One of the most common symptoms is pain that becomes worse after long periods of rest. This includes arising in the morning and after sitting for extended periods of time. Anyone who is struggling with heel pain should consult with a podiatrist who can help diagnose and provide various treatment options for plantar fasciitis.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact The podiatrists from Grand Haven Foot & Ankle. Our doctors can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Grand Haven, MI . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Plantar Fasciitis
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